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Japanese Maple Care Guide

Japanese maples, also known as Acer palmatum, are a popular ornamental tree that originated in Japan, Korea, and China. They are prized for their beautiful foliage, which ranges in color from bright green to deep red or purple. There are many different varieties of Japanese maples, each with its own unique characteristics and care requirements. Here's a fact sheet with information about some of the most popular varieties and how to care for them:

Bloodgod Japanese Maple
  • Bloodgood Japanese Maple: This variety is known for its deep red foliage that turns a brilliant scarlet in the fall. It grows slowly and typically reaches a height of 15 to 20 feet. Bloodgood Japanese maples prefer partial shade and well-drained soil.

 
Coral Bark Japanese Maple
  • Coral Bark Japanese Maple: This variety has bright green foliage that turns a brilliant yellow in the fall. The bark is a striking coral color in the winter months. Coral bark Japanese maples grow to be 15 to 25 feet tall and prefer partial shade and well-drained soil.

 
Emporer Japanese Maple
  • Emperor Japanese Maple: This variety has deep purple-red foliage that turns a bright scarlet in the fall. It grows to be 15 to 20 feet tall and prefers partial shade and well-drained soil.

 
Golden Full Moon Japanese Maple
  • Golden Full Moon Japanese Maple: This variety has bright green foliage that turns a beautiful golden yellow in the fall. It grows to be 10 to 20 feet tall and prefers partial shade and well-drained soil.

 
Laceleaf Japanese Maple
  • Laceleaf Japanese Maple: This variety is known for its delicate, lacy foliage that comes in shades of green, red, and purple. It grows to be 6 to 10 feet tall and prefers partial shade and well-drained soil.

 

Caring for Japanese Maples:

Japanese maples are generally easy to care for, but there are a few things to keep in mind:


  1. Watering: Japanese maples prefer moist, well-drained soil. Water them deeply once a week, or more often during hot, dry weather.

  2. Fertilizing: Japanese maples don't need much fertilizer, but you can give them a boost with a slow-release fertilizer in the spring.

  3. Pruning: Japanese maples should be pruned in the late winter or early spring, before new growth appears. Remove any dead or damaged branches, and thin out the interior of the tree to improve air circulation.

  4. Sunlight: Most Japanese maples prefer partial shade, especially during the hottest part of the day. However, some varieties can tolerate full sun.

  5. Pests and Diseases: Japanese maples can be susceptible to aphids, scale insects, and fungal diseases. Keep an eye out for any signs of trouble and treat as needed.


In conclusion, Japanese maples are a beautiful and versatile ornamental tree that can add color and interest to any landscape. By choosing the right variety and providing proper care, you can enjoy these trees for many years to come.

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